Conference Submissions

Guidance for contributors:

There are five types of submission for the conference:

Posters usually report empirical research and will be organized into the poster session; during which attendees will be invited to review the research presented and discuss findings with poster presenters. Presenters must be at their poster during their assigned time of the poster session and may choose to provide handouts.

Paper (not part of a pre-arranged symposium)
Paper submissions are individual, oral presentations, usually concerned with empirical, conceptual, philosophical, historical, or methodological issues. Submissions not accepted will be considered for a poster session.

Symposia (chair, 3 papers and a discussant)
Organized by a chairperson who moderates the 75–minute session, symposia are a series of three 20–minute presentations focused on either empirical research or conceptual, philosophical, historical, or methodological issues. A discussant highlights and integrates the contributions of various speakers in the symposium and moderates questions from the audience. Chairpersons are encouraged to use symposia as an opportunity to integrate related work by: 1) bringing speakers of different affiliations together rather than showcasing the work of a single group and 2) incorporating different kinds of talks (e.g., historical, conceptual and research-based) on the same topic into one symposium. Papers from submissions that are not accepted may be considered for a poster session.

Panel Discussions
Panel discussions consist of 3 to 5 speakers selected for some shared interest or expertise in an area. Panelists respond to one or more questions or issues, with time allotted for interaction among the speakers and with the audience. A panel discussion is organised by a chairperson who serves as the session’s moderator.

Skills Class
Skills classes are training sessions of 75 – 150 minutes and usually focus on some combination of experiential and/or didactic exercises. Skills classes should be regarded as opportunities to directly train specific skills rather than to present research findings, discuss conceptual, philosophical, or methodological issues, or share opinions. Submissions that are not clearly focused on training will be considered for other formats.

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